Women competing in two beautiful games: Soccer and analytics

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Soccer (or football) fans everywhere will turn their eyes to France over the next month to cheer on amazing women from 24 countries contending on the global stage.

These women compete at the highest level in an area that for too long was viewed as a man’s game.

In many ways the same can be said for analytics.

Women have always contributed mightily to math and statistics – from Ada Lovelace and Florence Nightingale in the 1800s, Gertrude Cox, Katherine Johnson, and Marjorie Lee Browne in the 1900s, and many more today.

More and more companies are seeing an increase in women entering analytics fields who are encouraged to bring their skills to bear on complex big data problems.

Just like the top soccer players need advanced abilities to attack, defend, work as a team and achieve goals, so too do women in analytics. These data scientists, statisticians and analytics pros use their talents to attack their organizations’ thorniest problems, whether fighting fraud, defending computer networks, bringing together disparate data and teams, or improving customer relationships, risk management and much more.

And while some SAS customers are using advanced analytics to find the next soccer star, SAS remains committed to encouraging and nurturing the best and brightest people to learn and excel in advanced analytics, including amazing and skilled women.

As I watch world-class soccer on the fields of France, I will also be applauding the remarkable women using analytics in countless boardrooms, classrooms, factory floors and workplaces around the globe.

In our data-driven world, we need all the playmakers and goal-scorers we can find. After all, in business, the beautiful game is analytics.

For more on SAS’ global efforts:

 

Top photo (cropped) by Helgi Halldórsson // attribution by Creative Commons

Bottom photo (cropped) by James Boyes // attribution by Creative Commons

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About Author

Oita Coleman

Executive Vice President, Research and Development

SAS VP of R&D Oita Coleman has led the SAS quality testing organization for many years, Coleman has contributed to SAS’ success through her devotion to continuous improvement. To ensure that SAS solutions meet business requirements, Coleman leads, coordinates and directs more than 800 software testing professionals in the United States, Scotland, China and India.

3 Comments

  1. Martin Demel

    It's great to see that every match of the women soccer worldcup is streamed in Europe this year for free (at least in Germany). This was not always the case and a big step forward. If we just think of the German team with 8 european championchip titles and 2 worldcup titles they are more successful than the mens 🙂 And France and England are playing a big role this year as well besides the favorite US team.
    It would be great to see a similar change in the analytics world with an increasing amount of female data scientists!

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