Chocolate smackdown: The final analysis

Recently, my colleague Ryan Lekivetz wrote about our trip to Discovery Summit Europe in Brussels and our plan to test whether Belgian chocolate was really better-tasting than US chocolate. Ryan has blogged in detail about the constraints of designing the study, as well as the factors involved. In this blog [...]

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Statistics is a team sport

Whether you’re a scientist, an engineer, a researcher, a statistician, data analyst, or some other subject matter expert, the more challenging problems typically require a collection of subject matter experts to build the most useful models, achieve the greatest insight and create the most value. Many organizations don’t see statistics [...]

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Beyond Spreadsheets: Ken Franklin, Oregon Department of Transportation

“Spreadsheets are familiar tools, which are relatively simple to use. However, the downside is that they result in fragmented thinking.” -- Ken Franklin, Performance Measurement Program Manager, Highway Division of Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) JMP customers use an array of tools and processes for exploratory data analysis to make [...]

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Chocolate smackdown: US vs. Belgium

This year, I was fortunate enough to present at the JMP Discovery Summit Europe in Brussels, Belgium. When looking for something to bring back for my colleagues in Cary, I first thought of chocolate (actually, my first thought was probably beer, but that didn’t seem like a good idea). One [...]

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Graph Makeover: Where same-sex couples live in the US

The following map appeared in an article titled "Where Same-Sex Couples Live" in the Upshot section of The New York Times shortly after the US Supreme Court decision ruled that the Constitution grants the right to same-sex marriage throughout the US. The map coloring shows the proportion of same-sex couples [...]

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Why it's important to brainstorm factors and levels in a designed experiment

The best time to plan an experiment is after you’ve done it – R.A. Fisher If you’ve read through my previous blog posts, I usually mention issues discovered during an experiment that I would change if I were to do the experiment again, or things to consider in the subsequent [...]

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How to stack data for a Oneway analysis

The data you want to import into JMP often requires some manipulation before it’s ready to be analyzed in JMP. Sometimes data is arranged so that a row contains information for multiple observations. To prepare your data for analysis, you must restructure it so that each row of the JMP [...]

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Toy cars and DOE: The results

Last time, I gave a Father’s Day tale of a father and son’s quest in dyeing toy cars. This time, I’ll share our results, but first remind you of the factors we studied: Car: A/B/C/D Dye type: Solid/liquid Dye amount: low/high (2 Tbsp liquid/4 Tbsp liquid per half cup, or [...]

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Seeing differently with Beau Lotto

After a photo of “the Dress” went viral on the Internet this past February, JMP developer John Ponte wrote an entertaining and informative blog post, What color is The Dress? JMP can tell you! We had shared this blog post with Beau Lotto, neuroscientist, human perception researcher, and Director of [...]

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How to create an axis break in JMP

I’ve been asked three times this year about how to make a graph in JMP with an axis break. Before I show how, I want to ask “Why?” The obvious answer to “Why?” is “to show items with very different values in one graph,” but that’s a little unsatisfying. I [...]

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