Sisyphus didn’t need a fitness tracker

In his pithy style, Seth Godin’s recent blog post Analytics without action said more in 32 words than most posts say in 320 words or most white papers say in 3200 words. (For those counting along, my opening sentence alone used 32 words). Godin’s blog post, in its entirety, stated: “Don’t measure […]

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Bad data management in a two-letter word

Big data? What about the small stuff? In preparing for an upcoming business trip, I decided to rent a car on Enterprise.com. I could have sworn that I had registered on the site at some point, but I couldn't find my user name and password. Call it a senior moment. […]

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SAS high-performance capabilities with Hadoop YARN

For Hadoop to be successful as part of the modern data architecture, it needs to integrate with existing tools. This integration allows you to reuse existing resources (licenses and personnel) and is typically 60% of the evaluation criteria for integration of Hadoop into the data center. One of the most […]

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Share your cluster – How Apache Hadoop YARN helps SAS

Even though it sounds like something you hear on a Montessori school playground, this theme “Share your cluster” echoes across many modern Apache Hadoop deployments. Data architects are plotting to assemble all their big data in one system – something that is now achievable thanks to the economics of modern […]

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Data science versus narrative psychology

My previous post explained how confirmation bias can prevent you from behaving like the natural data scientist you like to imagine you are by driving your decision making toward data that confirms your existing beliefs. This post tells the story of another cognitive bias that works against data science. Consider the following scenario: Company-wide […]

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Can data change an already made up mind?

Nowadays we hear a lot about how important it is that we are data-driven in our decision-making. We also hear a lot of criticism aimed at those that are driven more by intuition than data. Like most things in life, however, there’s a big difference between theory and practice. It’s […]

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On pronouns, online dating and data laziness

Working from home confers significant benefits. Two of my favorites are a two-second commute and the ability to take afternoon naps without offending judgmental coworkers. Among the drawbacks, though: I'm not going to randomly meet someone at the office. Like many single professionals, I have dabbled in the world of […]

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Bring the noise, boost the signal

Many people, myself included, occasionally complain about how noisy big data has made our world. While it is true that big data does broadcast more signal, not just more noise, we are not always able to tell the difference. Sometimes what sounds like meaningless background static is actually a big insight. Other times […]

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The ethics of algorithmic regulation

In my last three posts on data ethics, I explored a few of the ethical dilemmas in our data-driven world. From examining the ethical practices of free internet service providers to the problem of high-frequency trading, I’ve come to realize the depth and complexity of these issues. Anyone who's aware of these […]

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Data diversity

I have consulted on enough enterprise system implementations to know that there's anything but uniformity on how to roll out a new set of mature applications. I've seen plenty of different methodologies and technologies for relatively similar back-office systems (read: ERP and CRM). Of course, some were better than others, although […]

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