NCSU leads the pack in statistics conference contest

I zone out when my colleagues go on and on about North Carolina college basketball. With mascots like Blue Devils and Demon Deacons, you’d think it would be more fun to me than it is.

Add to that the fact that my university days were not spent at any of the big schools in North Carolina or surrounding areas. So I don’t really get all of this rivalry stuff.

However, I am surprised to see that North Carolina State University is dominating so thoroughly in the competition for free admission to the Women in Statistics conference May 15-17. Where are those brilliant stats students at UNC, Duke, NC Central, Wake Forest University, East Carolina University, UNC Greensboro, UNC Wilmington and UNC Charlotte?

It may be because SAS has its roots at NC State. Or maybe it is because NC State’s analytics programs are superior. I don’t really think that, but I’ll put that out there if it’ll get more entries coming in from other area schools.

In case you missed my earlier blog post announcing the competition, here’s the scoop: The JMP team and WIN (the SAS Women’s Initiatives Network) want to empower three statistics students by helping them attend the Women in Statistics conference. Entering is as easy as writing a short essay telling us why you want to attend this conference, what you hope to get out of it and how you plan to use statistics in your career. You can submit your entry at jmp.com/wis. You can learn more about the conference here, and you can read the contest rules here.

Says one entry from NC State, “I would love to attend this conference in order to hear speakers talk about their experience in their particular field in order to try to hone in on which route would be best for my career path.” Sounds like a winning reason to get a free pass.

OK, rival schools: Are you going to let NC State’s stat students take all of the free passes? To be considered in the competition, you need to get your entries in before 5:00 p.m. ET April 11, 2014. Submit your essay today!

tags: Academic, Statistics

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <p> <pre lang="" line="" escaped=""> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>